Archive for February, 2012

Nature and Health Magazine 2012 Products of the Year

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Natural_Health_2012_Awards

Nushie’s Natural Ice Creamery is Nature and Health Magazine 2012 Product of the Year

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Nushies Natural Nature Health Award

Nushie’s Natural Chocolate Organic Ice Creamery has been announced by Nature and Health Magazine as the 2012 Organic Ice Cream Award Winner.

 

Gluten May Lead To Rheumatoid Arthritis

Monday, February 27th, 2012

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye , malts, triticale and oats. It is a cause of coeliac disease which is a permanent intolerance to gluten. Natural news reports that gluten may also be a cause of rheumatoid arthritis.

“Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease characterized by inflammation and pain in the joints. Gluten intolerance leads to damage in the small intestine when gluten is present. Gluten is a protein found in most grains. Bread, pasta and pretzels are just some of the foods that contain gluten. People who are gluten intolerant may experience side effects from eating gluten, but some people do not have symptoms and could be unknowingly increasing their risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

Gluten intolerance

Having a gluten intolerance means that the body has a hard time digesting the gluten found in grains like wheat, barley, rye and possibly oats. If not managed, a gluten intolerance may lead to serious conditions such as diabetes and intestinal cancer. A gluten intolerance may cause aching joints, which is also a symptom of rheumatoid arthritis. Additional symptoms include muscle cramps, hair loss, nausea, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, mouth ulcers and seizures.

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease disease, meaning it causes the body’s immune system to attack healthy tissue. The cause of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown; it is found most commonly in middle-aged women, though men can get it too. Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis include pain and stiffness in the joints on both sides of the body. Most often this affects the fingers, wrists, knees, feet and ankles. Joints may also feel tender or warm during periods of inactivity. Deformity in the joints can occur over time, according to PubMed Health.

Autoimmune attack

When bacteria enters the body, the immune system recognizes the invader as something foreign. It attacks this invader to prevent illness. Unfortunately, in people with rheumatoid arthritis, the body thinks that their own body tissue is an invader and attacks it. The intestinal lining gets damaged during autoimmune attacks, which allows large food particles to pass through the damaged intestinal wall and get into the body. This condition is known as leaky gut and the autoimmune response. It may contribute to rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases, according to Robb Wolf. Wolf is a a former research biochemist and the author of theNew York Timesbestselling bookThe Paleo Solution. For someone who is gluten intolerant, the body attacks grains that contain gluten, leading to intestinal damage. This allows the gluten particles to get into the bloodstream and to the joints, which the immune system then attacks and damages as well.

Dietary therapy

Dietary therapy may reduce rheumatoid arthritis symptoms by eliminating foods that trigger an autoimmune response, according to an article published in theBritish Journal of Rheumatotologyin June 1993. This therapy may even slow the progression of the disease by eliminating all trigger foods from the diet. Dietary therapy is also useful as a diagnostic tool to discover unique food triggers. The therapy begins with eliminating every possible food trigger for arthritis out of the diet, such as beef, eggs, wheat, oranges, milk, peanuts, malt and soy. Food is then reintroduced one at a time to see if a person reacts to a particular item.”

All Nushie’s Natural whole foods are gluten free. They are also contain no preservatives or artificial additives. Nushie’s Natural whole foods are 100% plant based and are dairy free.

Sources for this article include:

RobbWolf.com: Frequently Asked Questions: Robb Wolf,http://robbwolf.com/faq/

PubMed Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis,http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001467/

British Journal of Rheumatotology: Review of Dietary Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis,http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

PubMed Health: Celiac Disease: Sprue,http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001280/

About the author:
Sarka-Jonae Miller is a health writer and novelist. She was certified as a personal fitness trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine and the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America. She also worked as a massage therapist, group exercise instructor and assistant martial arts instructor.
Miller’s premiere novel, “Between Boyfriends,” was recently publishedhttp://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006Q6TSCS/ref=cm_cr_mts_prod_img

Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/035075_gluten_intolerance_rheumatoid_arthritis.html#ixzz1ncLpLlrU

Cacoa Helps Prevent Cancer. New Study Finds

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Researchers from the Science and Technology Institute of Food and Nutrition in Spain have published the result of a study in the journalMolecular Nutrition & Food Research detailing the potent anti-carcinogenic effect of the natural chocolate compound, cocoa.

Natural News Reports:
“Scientists determined for the first time that regular consumption of cocoa negates the inflammatory effect of digestive oxidative stress that results in intestinal complaints and is a precursor to the genesis of colon cancer. Cocoa is now considered a superfood as it has been shown to improve blood lipids and help prevent cardiovascular disease in past research. The result of this current study demonstrates that a daily dose of the compound can help prevent colon cancer progression.

Researchers studied rats that had been fed a cocoa-rich diet consisting of twelve percent cocoa, as compared to a control group that received the same diet with the chocolate compound enrichment. Both groups were exposed to a chemical known to induce colon cancer. Animals such as mice and rats have been used for decades to conduct this type of research because they exhibit a similar line of carcinogenesis that is comparable to humans.

Cocoa polyphenols from dark chocolate significantly lower colon cancer risk

The study leader, Dr. Maria Angeles Martin Arribas noted“Being exposed to different poisons in the diet like toxins, mutagens and pro-carcinogens, the intestinal mucus is very susceptible to pathologies…foods like cocoa, which is rich in polyphenols, seems to play an important role in protecting against disease.”After a period of eight weeks, the scientists were able to confirm the protective effect of cocoa polyphenols in protecting against this insidious form of digestive cancer.

The study results showed a marked decrease in the number of pre-malignant neoplastic crypts in the lining of the colon in the cocoa-treated group as compared to the control animals. Further, the researchers found a rise in antioxidant defenses in the supplemented rats and a decrease in oxidative stress biomarkers that are known to be protective against chemical exposure and the prevention of colorectal cancer.

The team concluded that the protective effect of the bioactive compounds in cocoa stopped cell-signaling pathways that typically promote cell proliferation and lead to tumor development. The treated animals also exhibited a much higher degree of apoptosis, or normal programmed cell death of potentially cancerous tissues. It is important to note that milk chocolate is not a good source of cocoa due to its low concentration of the polyphenol and high sugar content, known to promote cancer. Choose a dark chocolate with a minimum 70 percent cocoa content to significantly lower the risk associated with colorectal cancer.”

At Nushie’s Natural we make our chocolate ice creamery with raw cacoa powder and nibs and as well as being healthy for you it tastes fabulous
Sources for this article include:

www.newsmaxhealth.com

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-01/f-sf-ccp012412.php

www.huffingtonpost.co.uk

About the author:
John Phillip is a Health Researcher and Author who writes regularly on the cutting edge use of diet, lifestyle modifications and targeted supplementation to enhance and improve the quality and length of life. John is the author of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’, a comprehensive EBook explaining how to use Diet, Exercise, Mind and Targeted Supplementation to achieve your weight loss goal. Visit My Optimal Health Resource to continue reading the latest health news updates, and to download your Free 48 page copy of ‘Your Healthy Weight Loss Plan’.

Learn more:http://www.naturalnews.com/034883_cocoa_dark_chocolate_colon_cancer.html#ixzz1mMDdh7nA

New Study Shows a Low Glycemic-Load Diet Significantly Reduces Chronic Disease

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012
Diets low in the Glycemic Index (GI) or Low Glycemic Load diets as they are often called have been found to promote health and well being and are beneficial for those suffering diseases such as diabetes, improves insulin resistance and  helps with weight control.
Among overweight and obese adults, a diet rich in slowly digested carbohydrates, such as whole grains, legumes and other high-fiber foods, significantly reduces markers of inflammation associated with chronic disease, according to a new study by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Such a “low-glycemic-load” diet, which does not cause blood-glucose levels to spike, also increases a hormone that helps regulate the metabolism of fat and sugar.
These findings are published in the February print issue ofThe Journal of Nutrition.
Science Daily reports:
“The controlled, randomized feeding study, which involved 80 healthy Seattle-area men and women — half of normal weight and half overweight or obese — found that among overweight and obese study participants, a low-glycemic-load diet reduced a biomarker of inflammation called C-reactive protein by about 22 percent.
“This finding is important and clinically useful since C-reactive protein is associated with an increased risk for many cancers as well as cardiovascular disease,” said lead author Marian Neuhouser, Ph.D., R.D., a member of the Cancer Prevention Program in the Public Health Sciences Division at the Hutchinson Center. “Lowering inflammatory factors is important for reducing a broad range of health risks. Showing that a low-glycemic-load diet can improve health is important for the millions of Americans who are overweight or obese.”
Neuhouser and colleagues also found that among overweight and obese study participants, a low-glycemic-load diet modestly increased — by about 5 percent — blood levels of a protein hormone called adiponectin. This hormone plays a key role in protecting against several cancers, including breast cancer, as well as metabolic disorders such as type-2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and hardening of the arteries.
“Glycemic load” refers to how the intake of carbohydrates, adjusted for total grams of carbohydrate, affects blood-sugar levels. Lentils or pinto beans have a glycemic load that is approximately three times lower than instant mashed potatoes, for example, and therefore won’t cause blood-sugar levels to rise as quickly.
Study participants completed two 28-day feeding periods in random order — one featuring high-glycemic-load carbohydrates, which typically are low-fiber, highly processed carbs such as white sugar, fruit in canned syrup and white flour; and the other featuring low-glycemic-load carbohydrates, which are typically higher in fiber, such as whole-grain breads and cereals. The diets were identical in carbohydrate content, calories and macronutrients. All food was provided by the Hutchinson Center’s Human Nutrition Laboratory, and study participants maintained weight and physical activity throughout.
“Because the two diets differed only by glycemic load, we can infer that the changes we observed in important biomarkers were due to diet alone,” Neuhouser said.
“The bottom line is that when it comes to reducing markers of chronic-disease risk, not all carbohydrates are created equal. Quality matters,” she said. “There are easy dietary changes people can make. Whenever possible, choose carbohydrates that are less likely to cause rapid spikes in blood glucose.” These types of low-glycemic-load carbs include whole grains; legumes such as kidney beans, soy beans, pinto beans and lentils; milk; and fruits such as apples, oranges, grapefruit and pears. Neuhouser also recommends avoiding high-glycemic-load carbohydrates that quickly raise blood glucose. These include highly processed foods that are full of white sugar and white flour, and sugar-sweetened beverages and breakfast cereals.
The study was funded by the National Cancer Institute’s Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer (TREC) Initiative”
Nushies Natural certified organic whole foods are all low GI foods and have a low glycemic load. Nushie’s Natural Ice Creamery is also dairy and gluten free and tastes fabulous.